On July 6, NYK Line and Tokyo LNG Tanker Co. Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd., held a naming ceremony for a jointly owned LNG carrier being built at the Sakaide Shipyard of the Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation. At the ceremony, Tsuyoshi Okamoto, the president of Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd., named the vessel Energy Horizon, and his wife cut the guy rope. Yasumi Kudo, the president of NYK, was also in attendance.

The word “horizon” was used in the vessel’s name to reflect the future potential of LNG as an energy resource.

 

The joint ownership of Energy Horizon is the second between Tokyo LNG Tanker, which owns 10 percent of the vessel, and NYK, which owns the remaining 90 percent. After construction is completed, the ship will be chartered for 20 years and be used for shipments of LNG to Japan from various countries, including Australia.

The vessel is a moss-type LNG carrier, the largest type, and has a tank capacity of 177,000 m3 (cargo capacity: 175,000 m3), which makes it possible to increase transport efficiency. In addition, this is a new energy-saving vessel, the first in the world to be equipped with a reheat turbine plant,1 which reduces fuel consumption by up to 15 percent over conventional steam turbine vessels.
 
NYK will continue to make every effort to provide stable, environment-friendly LNG transportation.
 
l         Vessel Details
Tank Capacity: 177,000 m3 (cargo capacity: 175,000 m3)
Length Overall: about 300.00 m
Breadth: about 52.00 m
Gross Tonnage: about 143,000 tons
Shipyard: Sakaide Shipyard, Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation
Commencement of Service: August 2011 (scheduled)
 
l         Tokyo LNG Tanker Co. Ltd.
Tokyo LNG Tanker Co. Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd., was established in 1991 to provide LNG transportation for Tokyo Gas, and today the company has capital of 1.2 billion yen, owns and charters a total of 10 vessels, and conducts LNG/LPG carrier operations.
 
1Reheat turbine plant
A reheat turbine plant is a highly efficiency turbine plant that makes use of a reheat cycle that retains the reliability and maintainability of a conventional turbine plant. Compared to a conventional turbine, plant efficiency is increased by about 15 percent. The reheat cycle transfers steam from the steam turbine back to the boiler and reheats it. The generated high-temperature steam is then sent back to the turbine.


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